Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test Cost
33,000.00 26,000.00 Book Test
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Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test Cost

33,000.00 26,000.00

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DNA Labs India Hereditary cancer NGS panel covers 105 Cancer genes related to different types of cancers.

Most cancers occur in people who have a strong family history of cancer. In most families, we see more of the same kind, or related kinds, of cancer than we would expect to see when compared to the general population. This is often called familial or hereditary cancer. In those families with hereditary cancer, that cancer risk is passed down through generations by inheriting altered genes (in other words, genes with mutations) which increase the risk to develop cancer. Determining which of these families have cancer-related to an inherited gene mutation is important, as the cancer risks in hereditary cancer families are much higher than the general population.

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Description

Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test Details:

Comprehensive hereditary cancer panel 105 genes list covered (NGS Panel ALK, APC, ATM, BAP1, BLM, BMPR1A, BRIP1, CDC73, CDH1, CDK4, CDKN2A, CEBPA, CHEK2, CYLD, DDB2, DICER1, ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, ERCC5, EXT1, EXT2, EZH2, FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2, FANCF, FANCG, FH, FLCN, GATA2, GDNF, HNF1A, HRAS, KIT, MEN1, MET, MITF, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, NF1, NF2, NSD1, PALB2, PAX5, PDGFRA, PHOX2B, PMS1, PMS2, POT1, PRKAR1A, PTCH1, PTEN, RB1, RECQL4, RET, RUNX1, SBDS, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SMAD4, SMARCB1, STK11, SUFU, TP53, TSC1, TSC2, VHL, WRN, WT1, XPA, XPC)

Risk factors for hereditary cancer:  A hereditary cancer is any cancer caused by an inherited gene mutation.

People who are concerned about whether their family history puts them at risk for cancer should consult with a genetic counsellor. The features of a person’s personal or family medical history that, particularly in combination, may suggest a hereditary cancer syndrome include:

  • Cancer was diagnosed at an unusually young age
  • Several different types of cancer occurred in the same person
  • Cancer in both organs in a set of paired organs, such as both kidneys or both breasts
  • You have several first-degree relatives (mother, father, sisters, brothers, children) with cancer.
  • Many relatives on one side of your family have had the same type of cancer.
  • A cluster of cancers in your family have been linked to a single gene mutation (such as some types of breast, ovarian, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers).
  • A family member has more than 1 type of cancer.
  • Family members have had cancer at a younger age than normal for that type of cancer.
  • Close relatives have cancers that are linked to hereditary cancer syndromes.
  • A family member has rare cancer, such as breast cancer in a man or retinoblastoma (a type of eye cancer).
  • A physical finding is linked to an inherited cancer (such as having many colon polyps).
  • One or more family members have already had genetic testing that found a mutation.
  • Being a member of a racial or ethnic group that is known to have an increased risk of having a certain inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome and having one or more of the above features as well Several family members with cancerUnusual cases of a specific cancer type (for example, breast cancer in a man)
  • If a person is concerned that they may have an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome in their family, it is generally recommended that, when possible, a family member with cancer have genetic counselling and testing first, to identify with more certainty if cancer in the family is due to an inherited genetic variant.

Test Methodology

The entire coding region of a panel of genes related to hereditary cancer is examined by next-generation sequencing analysis. Additionally, portions of the flanking noncoding regions are also examined.  Genes tested in this panel include ALK, APC, ATM, BAP1, BLM, BMPR1A, BRIP1, CDC73, CDH1, CDK4, CDKN2A, CEBPA, CHEK2, CYLD, DDB2, DICER1, ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, ERCC5, EXT1, EXT2, EZH2, FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2, FANCF, FANCG, FH, FLCN, GATA2, GDNF, HNF1A, HRAS, KIT, MEN1, MET, MITF, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, NF1, NF2, NSD1, PALB2, PAX5, PDGFRA, PHOX2B, PMS1, PMS2, POT1, PRKAR1A, PTCH1, PTEN, RB1, RECQL4, RET, RUNX1, SBDS, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SMAD4, SMARCB1, STK11, SUFU, TP53, TSC1, TSC2, VHL, WRN, WT1, XPA, XPC.

Results are reported using ACMG guidelines and nomenclature recommended by the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS).

Should You Get Genetic Testing for Cancer Risk?

About 5% to 10% of all cancers are thought to be related to gene mutations that are inherited or passed down through the family. Having an inherited genetic mutation does not mean you will get cancer. It means you are at a higher risk for developing a certain type or types of cancer.

Medical tests can look for many inherited gene mutations. This type of testing is called predictive genetic testing. Most people do not need this type of genetic testing. It’s usually recommended when certain types of cancer run in a family and a gene mutation is suspected.

What is Hereditary Cancer?

Cancer arises from the uncontrolled growth of cells. Cancer is caused by harmful changes (mutations) in the genetic messages (genes) which control the growth and division of cells which prevent them from being able to do their jobs effectively.

We receive one complete copy of our genes from our mother and another from our father. It is the accumulation of multiple mutations over many years that disrupts the growth control of the cell and allows a normal cell to grow without control and eventually become cancer.

Most cases of cancer occur in the absence of significant family history and are not inherited. In these families, the mutations causing cancer occur only in the tumour itself and are all acquired after birth. Although the cause is seldom known, these acquired mutations may be the result of environmental or hormonal exposures, or mistakes which can occasionally occur when a cell divides.

Acquired gene mutations cannot be passed from one generation to the next, so this type of cancer is considered “sporadic” (a chance event) and not hereditary. Just by chance, some families have several members affected by sporadic cancers.

The interaction of multiple minor genes and environmental influences may also increase the risk of developing cancer. Although little is known in this area, it is possible, for example, that individuals with a moderate family history of cancer may be more susceptible to cancer-causing agents in the environment.

This type of moderately increased cancer risk can be called a “familial” risk. At this time, we do not have genetic testing available for familial cancers and instead rely on family history interpretation.

About 5 to 10 per cent of cancers are thought to be hereditary. In these cases, an individual inherits a copy of a growth control gene with a mutation from one parent and a working copy of the same gene from the other parent. The gene with the mutation is also called a “cancer susceptibility gene.”

Since this cancer susceptibility gene is inherited, it is found in every cell of the body, but the working copy of the gene keeps each cell working properly. However, if the working copy of the gene in a cell becomes damaged by a mutation, that cell can lose its growth control and become cancerous.

Thus, individuals who inherit a cancer susceptibility gene have a much greater chance of developing certain cancers in their lifetime. However, not everyone with an inherited cancer susceptibility gene will develop cancer.

Which Hereditary Conditions Raise My Chances of Getting Cancer?

Several hereditary conditions can raise your chances of getting cancer. Two of the most common are hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome and Lynch syndrome.

People with HBOC syndrome have a higher risk for breast, ovarian, high-grade prostate, and pancreatic cancer. Having this syndrome means you have mutations (changes) in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. People with Lynch syndrome have a higher risk for colorectal, uterine, and ovarian cancers.

Hereditary Breast & Ovarian Cancer Syndrome:

In some families, many women develop breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Often these cancers are found in women who are younger than the usual age these cancers are found, and some women might have more than one cancer (such as breast cancer in both breasts, or both breast and ovarian cancer). This is known as Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC).

Most often, HBOC is caused by an inherited mutation in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. (Some families have HBOC based on cancer history but don’t have mutations in either of these genes. Scientists believe that there might also be other genes that can cause HBOC.)

The risk of breast and ovarian cancer is very high in women with mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2, but it tends to be higher with BRCA1 mutations. Along with breast and ovarian cancer, this syndrome can also lead to fallopian tube cancer, primary peritoneal cancer, male breast cancer pancreatic cancer, and prostate cancer, as well as some others. Male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and prostate cancer can be seen with mutations in either gene, but are more common in people with BRCA2 mutations.

Women with a strong family history of breast cancer and ovarian cancer may choose to undergo genetic counselling to help estimate their risk for having a mutation in one of the BRCA genes.

Because breast cancer is rare in men, men with this cancer are often offered genetic counselling and testing for BRCA mutations. Although having a mutation is less likely to affect a man’s future health than it is a woman’s, it can affect his risk of some cancers, such as prostate and pancreatic cancer. It can also be helpful for a man’s close relatives to know that he has a mutation and that they might be at risk.

Why is this test important?

These genetic tests are used as a guide for treating certain cancers. They help to inform a healthcare practitioner as to whether certain targeted cancer drugs may or may not work. Genes are made up of DNA, which is like the code required for the production of certain proteins.

Alteration in the DNA, called polymorphisms or mutations, can occur throughout the population. Mutations can affect all cells but can occur later in life due to exposures to radiation, toxins or any other unknown reasons, resulting in cancer.

In certain types of cancers, there may be a genetic mutation that leads to an increased amount of a particular protein present in the tumour tissue or to the production of a protein that has altered activity. Tumours with these mutations tend to grow and spread more aggressively and are more resistant to chemotherapy too.

Genetic tests for cancer therapy detect the mutations, thereby identifying tumours that may be susceptible to targeted therapy. Conversely, genetic tests may also identify tumours that will not respond to targeted therapy.

The benefits of genetic testing One of the advantages of knowing whether you have a genetic mutation or not is that you can work with your doctor to assess your cancer risks and facilitate preventive oncology.

This can help prevent cancer completely or at least find it an early stage when it’s most treatable. This will not just inform you but will also prepare your family for themselves.

What should I do if I have a genetic mutation?

  • Having a genetic mutation does not mean you will get cancer. You can do things to lower or manage your cancer risk. Talk to your doctor about Tests.
  • You may need to start getting tested earlier and get tested more often than other people. Medicine or surgery that could lower your cancer risk.
  • Making healthy choices like quitting smoking, not drinking alcohol, exercising regularly, and keeping a healthy weight.

What type of sample are needed to do a Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test?

An EDTA blood or DNA for testing can be obtained from several bodily sources. The cells are the most commonly tested are derived.

Standard Biological Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test Samples: EDTA blood or DNA

How accurate is the Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test?

Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test is generally considered to be the most accurate testing method available. DNA Labs India’s Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test is regarded as a benchmark by most doctors. The most precise and precise Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test in India.

How many days does it take to obtain Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test results?

Results of Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test test are usually available from the laboratory within one week to 5 weeks.

For a standard Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test, DNA Labs India returns Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test results in 7 to 10 business days once all samples are received at the lab.

DNA Labs India understands that waiting for Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test results for this potentially life-changing test is stressful, so we provide speedy service without sacrificing accuracy.

Once complete, results are posted immediately to our secure online portal, and you will be notified by email right away.

Why Choose DNA Labs India for Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test?

DNA labs India’s Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test follows with dual testing for 100% accuracy when determining a Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test.

  • We are the leading lab for Comprehensive hereditary cancer NGS panel Test in India.
  • Greater Accuracy
  • Collection centres across India
  • Outstanding customer service
  • Strict privacy and confidentiality assured
  • Full-service laboratories providing testing for use in complex cases

 

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